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Notice of an event of special interest to historians of Native Americans and the West.


 

Cynthia A. Kierner

Professor of History

Director, Ph.D. Program in History

George Mason University

Fairfax, Virginia 22030


From: David McKenzie <[log in to unmask]>
Sent: Sunday, March 22, 2015 10:07 PM
To: Cynthia A Kierner
Subject: Fwd: Next Potomac Corral Talk: Timothy McKeown, March 28
 
Hi Cindy,

I hope you are well.

I’m part of a group of Western historians called the Potomac Corral, and we are hosting a talk this coming Saturday that I think might interest some others in the M.A. and Ph.D. programs. Would you mind sending it out on the listserv?

Thanks!

David

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David Patrick McKenzie
Digital Projects Manager, Ford's Theatre Society
History Ph.D. Student, George Mason University

Begin forwarded message:

From: David McKenzie <[log in to unmask]>
Date: March 10, 2015 at 11:04:52 PM EDT
Subject: Next Potomac Corral Talk: Timothy McKeown, March 28
To: David McKenzie <[log in to unmask]>

Hello Potomac Corral friends and members,

The Potomac Corral of Westerners International is pleased to welcome Dr. C. Timothy McKeown for our next talk on Saturday, March 28 at 4 p.m.!

The talk will take place at the Tenley-Friendship Neighborhood Library, second floor meeting room. The library is located at 4450 Wisconsin Ave NW, Washington, DC 20016, near the Tenleytown Metro Station.

A group will go to dinner at Guapo’s, across the street from the library, immediately afterward.

Please register here: https://potomaccorral.wordpress.com/2015/03/11/mckeown-march-28/

In the Smaller Scope of Conscience: Legislative and Administrative Histories of the Federal Mandates for Repatriation of Native American Cultural Items

Nearly 25 years ago, Congress enacted twin legislative mandates requiring the disposition or repatriation of Native American human remains, funerary objects, sacred objects, or objects of cultural patrimony removed from federal lands or in the possession or control of federal agencies or institutions receiving federal funds, and making it a criminal offense to traffic in such cultural items under certain circumstances. These two laws – the National Museum of the American Indian Act of 1989 and the Native American Graves Protection and Repatriation Act of 1990 – were the result of four years of intensive negotiation between representatives of various national Native American, archaeological, and museum organizations and federal agencies. The final legislation was called a “true compromise” by Senator John McCain. This presentation will discuss some of the compromises made during the legislative process and look at their implications over the past 25 years of the laws’ implementation.

C. Timothy McKeown is a legal anthropologist. From 1991 to 2009, he was involved directly in the national implementation of the Native American Graves Protection and Repatriation Act. Since 2010, he has provided technical and policy advice on repatriation to Indian tribes and national Native American organizations. His legislative history of the two statutes – In the Smaller Scope of Conscience: The Struggle for National Repatriation Legislation, 1986-1990 – is published by the University of Arizona Press. He is currently working on a follow-up volume on the implementation of the two repatriation statutes. Tim earned his BA (1977) in anthropology from the University of South Florida and MA (1982) and PhD (1988) in anthropology from Northwestern University. He is currently an adjunct fellow at the National Centre for Indigenous Studies, Australian National University.


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David Patrick McKenzie
Digital Projects Manager, Ford's Theatre Society
History Ph.D. Student, George Mason University