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November 2013

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Thu, 14 Nov 2013 13:46:04 +0000
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Cynthia A Kierner <[log in to unmask]>
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-----Original Message-----
From: H-NET/OIEAHC Electronic Association in Early American Studies [mailto:[log in to unmask]] On Behalf Of John Saillant
Sent: Thursday, November 14, 2013 7:21 AM
To: [log in to unmask]
Subject: FELLOWSHIPS: OIEAHC Lapidus Awards for Grad Students

The Omohundro Institute of Early American History and Culture will offer up to eight $500 fellowships annually to support advanced graduate student research related to Early American and transatlantic print culture.

Up to four $500 fellowships will be awarded to support advanced graduate student research related to "Slavery and Print Culture" in the Early American and transatlantic world.

Up to four $500 fellowships will be awarded to support advanced graduate student research related to Early American and transatlantic print culture, including authorship, production, circulation, and reception.

Applicants for each topic area should submit an electronic file with a 500-word description of their dissertation project, a c.v., and a one-paragraph research agenda for the calendar year by clicking here.

The application deadline is January 15, 2014. Fellowship recipients may expect to be notified of the award by early spring and must provide a one-page report of their progress no more than twelve months later.

Both of these fellowships are made possible through the generous support of Sid Lapidus and are prompted by his interest in investigating the anonymous authorship of the 1808 letter to Thomas Jefferson from "a Slave," discussed by Thomas N. Baker in the January 2011 issue of the William and Mary Quarterly.

For more information, please visit: 
http://oieahc.wm.edu/fellowship/lapidus/index.cfm

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